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Home Network Security

1448644898859For those of us who grew up in the 80’s, we can probably think back to a time when hackers were looked upon as being pretty cool robin hood style outriders who dared to stand up against oppressors. The movie Wargames demonstrated that fascination about the possibilities of connectivity. Drinking terminals, discarded fast food boxes and unfinished cans of flat cola. The reality nowadays is considerably murkier. Hardly a week goes by without a story breaking about the nefarious activities of the hacking ‘community’ which is nowadays better described as organised criminals. As we’ve seen in the past it’s not just security agencies, nuclear launch facilities, or evil dictators that get stiffed by hackers, it’s more often normal folk like us.

In recent years hacking has continued to hit the headlines almost every week. The most well known has to be the UK phone hacking scandal. Ironically, that wasn’t even a true example of hacking as the clueless victims of the “hack” had merely neglected to change the pin on their voicemail from its default setting. It all goes to show that the weakest link in the security chain is usually human stupidity. I suppose calling it “hacking” deflected the glare of publicity away from their own stupidity but thats another discussion for another day. The ones that hit the headlines are usually interesting in some way, but they pale into insignificance when compared to the millions of attempts that occur every day to the rest of us. Cybercrime is big business. We hear it so often that the words threaten to lose their impact.

According to the Trustwave 2016 Global Security Report, there was a recorded 26.6 million victims of hacking and identity theft in a 12 month period during 2015. A number which roughly equates to one person being hacked every second. In 2015, 96% of all hacking attacks were credit card, or payment data theft used in fraudulent online or at the till transactions. Over £24 billion was estimated to be have been lost to identity theft from hackers, with a potential loss averaging £5,061 per household globally.

The checklist of items the hacker tends to go for are usernames, passwords, PINs, National Insurance numbers, phone and utility account numbers, bank and credit card details, employee numbers, driving licence and passport numbers, insurance documentation and account numbers, and any other financial background account details.

How they get this data ranges from acquiring remote access to your computer, SQL injections to a popular website, spoofing a banking or other financial website, remote code execution, exploits in website trust certificates, physical theft, and through social media.

On the subject of social media there are some interesting and worrying facts. According to sources, 18% of people under the age of 19 were the victims of a phishing scam, and 74% were victims when they followed links posted by they know that they believed were legitimate. Furthermore, 74% of all social media users share their birthday information publicly. 69% shared the schools and universities they attended. An amazing 22% of users publicly share their phone numbers, and unsurprisingly, 15% share the names of their furry little friends.

If these numbers aren’t scary enough, there’s the fact that 15% of all Wi-Fi users worldwide are still using WEP encryption for their home WIFI and, 91% of all public Wi-Fi hotspots are unsecured, unmonitored, and available 24x7x365.

And finally, it’s estimated that 11% of all spam contains some kind of code designed to hijack your computer if opened. A further 8% of all spam contains links to websites that have been designed to grab information or download some trojan to gain access behind your firewall.

WHAT CAN WE DO?

We’ve put together a number of measures to help you prevent hackers invading your private domain, whether in the cloud or locally inside your trusted networks.

We don’t suggest you take thing to the extreme but there is a happy medium where you can do everything you reasonably can to protect yourself and educate yourself to spot the signs when they arise.

NETWORK PROTECTION

Starting with the home network there are a number of easy wins we can gain to stop the baddies from getting too close. Most of these steps are surprisingly simple.

CHANGE ROUTER ADMINISTRATOR CREDENTIALS

This is one of the most common points of entry for someone to gain access to your home network. The router you received from your ISP may well be up to date and offer the best possible forms of encryption, but they have a weakness. They usually come with a limited number of preconfigured SSIDs and WIFI keys which can be found on the back of the router on a sticker.

It doesn’t take too much gumption to do a google search and find out the SSIDs and WIFI keys used by the big ISP’s. It doesn’t help that your router is usually advertising itself as a BT, Sky or Virgin Media router and that just makes life easier for the baddies.

A reasonably savvy hacker can therefore gain access to your router, get connected, and even log in using the weak default logins. For this reason we recommend that our customers change the default router usernames and passwords to something more complex.

CHECK WIRELESS ENCRYPTION

Most routers come with a level of encryption already active, but there are some examples where the default state of encryption may be extremely weak, or worse still, completely open.

If you scan your WIFI using your phone and you see a padlock beside your network name then you at least know you have some encryption active. If you then look on your router and it tells you that the encryption method is WEP then you’ll need to fix that PDQ. WEP is the older standard of wireless encryption and can be cracked in less than fifteen minutes by using a variety of tools, all of which are freely available on the net. Unfortunately, WPA isn’t great either, but the its generally strong enough to hold back low level hackers.

USE MAC ADDRESS FILTERING

Every network interface has a unique identifier known as a MAC (Media Access Code) address, regardless of whether it’s a computer, tablet, phone, or sky box.

The idea behind MAC address filtering is simple enough. You obtain the MAC addresses of your devices at home and enter them into the router so that only those you know about are able to connect. Obviously, if you have loads of network connected devices this could take a while. But it will improve your chancer against a drive by hacker in a car outside your home with their laptop balanced on their dashboard.

But hey, MAC addresses can be spoofed, so while the junior hacker will likely give up the more determined one will not. Think of MAC address filtering as putting a padlock on the garden gate; it may stop most casual nasties from entering your garden, but those who really want to get in there will just jump over.

DISABLE SSID BROADCAST

There are two schools of thought when it comes to hiding your network SSID. The first recommends hiding your router’s SSID from the public view, with the idea that invisibility to those around you makes you somehow immune to their attempts. But a hidden SSID may seem like a far more juicy target to a determined hacker with an SSID radio grabber. Both sides of the argument have merit. Are you successfully hidden by being invisible, or is the best hiding place in plain sight? Probably invisible on balance.

USE STATIC IP ADDRESSES

By default your router will automatically assign an IP address to any device that connects to it, so the pair, and the rest of the network, can communicate successfully.

DHCP (Dynamic Host Configuration Protocol) is the name for this feature, and it makes perfect sense. After all, who wants to have to add new IP addresses to new devices every time they connect to your network?

On the other hand, anyone who gains access to your router will now have a valid IP address which allows it to communicate with your network. So to some degree it’s worth considering opting out of DHCP controlled IP addresses and instead configuring your devices and computers to use something like 10.10.0.0 as their range of IP addresses.

Like most good anti-hacking attempts though, this will only slow the intruder down.

ROUTER POSITION

This simple network protection act is one of the best, if done correctly.

Believe it or not, by moving your router to the centre of your house, or more to the rear (depending on where your closest neighbours or the road is), you are limiting the range of your wireless broadcast signal.

Most routers are located in the front room where the master phone socket usually is. This means the router can reach most corners of the house, and to some degree beyond the house. If someone was moving down the road, for example, sampling wireless networks then they would come across yours as they passed your house.

If the router is situated in a more central location, away from the front window, then the signal may be too weak to get a successful reading without having to stand on your porch.

SWITCH OFF THE ROUTER WHEN YOU’RE NOT USING IT

Most people will already do this anyway. Since no one is using the router, what’s the point of wasting electricity?

However, a lot of people simply have their router powered on all the time, regardless of whether they are in the house or not. Granted there are those who will be running a server, or downloading something while at work or asleep, but the vast majority just keep it on.

If you’re not using the internet or any other home network resource, it’s a good idea to power off the router. And if you’re away for an extended period, then do the same.

BEYOND THE HOME NETWORK.

cloud-computingHome network security is one thing, and frankly it’s not all that often you’ll get a team of hackers travelling down your street with the intent of gaining access to you and your neighbour’s home networks.

Where most of us fall foul in terms of hacking is when we’re online and surfing happily without a care in the world.

PASSWORDS

Passwords are the single weakest point of entry for the online hacker. Face it, how many of us use the same password for pretty much every website we visit? Some people even use the same password for access to a forum that they use for their online banking, pretty alarming we think you’ll agree.

Using the same password on every site you visit is like giving someone the skeleton key to your digital life. It’s a bloody pain having different passwords for every different site, but when you stop and think logically about it, doing so leaves you incredibly vulnerable to those who have ill intentions with regards to your identity and bank balance. For many a kind of compromise is usually sufficient. Many of the sites we use on the net that require us to use a password are pretty innocuous. Using the same password for this swathe is normally fine but make sure that you use strong passwords for those services that are really sensitive. More about that below.

Where passwords are concerned, using ‘12345’, ‘password’, or ‘qwerty’ isn’t going to stop someone from gaining access. And passwords such as ‘L3tmeIn’ aren’t much better either. Additionally, as we mentioned earlier, using the names of your pets may seem like a good idea, maybe even mixing their names with the date of your birth as well sounds like a solid plan, but if you then go and plaster Mr Tiggywinles, Rover, or Fido’s name all over public posts on Facebook along with pictures of you blowing out the candles on your birthday cake then you’ve just seriously lowered the strength of your passwords from staying secret.

Security questions and two-phase verification techniques are now being employed by a number of credible sites. What this means is that you basically enter more than one password to log into your account. Most online banking is done this way now, and sometimes includes a visual verification such as a pre-selected thumbnail image from a range that the user can click on to verify who they are.

If you have trouble coming up with passwords yourself, then there are a number of password managers available that can help you create highly secure combinations of letters, numbers, and special symbols unique for every website you visit. Even better they’ll even store them for you in the program itself in case you forget them. They are usually managed by one ultra secret master password. Be sure to keep that one complex and safe. Some examples are as follows.

LastPass – LastPass allows you to create a single username and password while securely entering the correct details.

Kaspersky Password Manager – A fully automated and powerful password manager that can store your username and password details, then enter them into the site for you while remaining encrypted throughout.

Either way, human beings are the weakest link in the secure password chain so any help you can get is to be welcomed.

DON’T TELL THE WORLD EVERYTHING

David Glasser, the MD at Twitter US, recently admitted, “I hate to say it, but in reality, people need to share a little bit less about themselves.”

While there’s nothing wrong with letting your nearest and dearest know what you’re up to on Facebook, you really must consider the fact that they probably aren’t the only ones reading. Facebook and Twitter often come under fire because of their attempts to make users newsfeeds public by default and where you have to jump through hoops to limit the views for your own timeline.

It’s worth taking the time to double-check the security settings on all your social media sites and check back often. Are the things you’re posting on your timeline or feeds viewable by friends only, or friends of friends? Has it mysteriously been reverted back to public viewing? Are you sure you want to display that picture of you sat at your desk with all that information on the screen behind you?

As we said before publicly announcing your private details, like when you’re on your hols and for how long, the names and birthdays of you, your nearest and dearest, children, pets and so on, isn’t particularly smart, but hey we’re all guilty of it.

CLOUD SECURITY

The newsworthy hacking events of Pippa Middleton and many others has rammed home to us the fact that cloud storage isn’t quite as secure as we’d like to think.

Every device, either Android, Microsoft, or Apple, is capable of backing up your photos to its own particular cloud storage solution – sometimes it’s even a default setting. Most of the time the cloud solutions used are so secure that anyone trying to hack into them will have a pretty rough time of it, and no doubt bring down the wrathful vengeance of Google or Apple upon themselves. How the celebrity photos and videos were obtained is something you’ll have to find out for yourselves, but if storing stuff on the cloud is alarming you there are a couple of choices.

The first is to encrypt everything locally on your computer before uploading it to the cloud. This will take time, we’ll grant you, but it means only you’ll be able to decrypt them. Secondly, you could always compress everything first, using Winzip/Winrar etc., then password the compressed file. Breaking a password compressed file takes far longer than it’s actually worth, providing you’re not a celebrity, so most hackers won’t bother.

Finally, there are cloud storage solutions that encrypt the data on the device before uploading it to the also fully encrypted servers e.g. SpiderOak and Tresorit.

CONCLUSION

The very fact that you’re online makes you a potential target. If you’re sitting back and saying “they’ll have no interest in me” you’re sadly mistaken. Lets face it, you’re easy to find, easy to hack, and probably won’t do much about it when you do get hacked. Its in your best interests to stay up to speed with the latest hacking techniques and how to defend yourself against them.

Features of Surveillance Systems

dvrThere are many features that are available with different DVR home and small business surveillance systems. Some features come as standard with many surveillance systems, while other features can cost extra. The following table provides a list of the most valuable features of any DVR home and small business surveillance system for those who want to stick to a tight budget.

Motion Detection – These pick up movement within the home and small business, when the alarm is set; strategically placed throughout the home and small business to cover all entrances and exits

Interactive Monitoring – Allows home and small business owner to access system via cell phone and Internet; system can be turned on or off and settings changed remotely; also offers email and text alerts

There are many features offered with various DVR home and small business surveillance systems. The more expensive the system, the more features it should offer. For those who don’t want to spend excessive amounts of money, but still want ultimate protection, the above features are a good selection.

What to Consider When on a Budget

DVR home and small business surveillance systems can be very expensive, but they don’t have to be. There are a few aspects of any surveillance systems that, if carefully considered, can help the buyer get the most out of even the smallest of budgets.

Size of the Hard Drive

A DVR system can record onto a hard drive. The size of the hard drive determines the length of recording time the system is capable of. There are various hard drive sizes, with the most common being , 500 GB to 750 GB, and 1 TB to 2 TB, Naturally, the smaller the hard drive, the less expensive the unit. A unit that offers up to 500 GB is normally more than sufficient for most home and small business surveillance needs, making it unnecessary to spend more money purchasing a larger hard drive.

Number of Channels

The number of channels a surveillance system offers determines the number of different cameras that can be used with the system. Buyers generally have the option of 4, 8, 16, or 32 channels. For most residential home and small business surveillance needs, a four or eight channel system is sufficient. This means the user has up to a maximum of eight cameras to use.

Camera Resolution

The term resolution refers to the number of the smallest picture elements or pixels that make up a video image. The more picture elements, the better the detail of the picture. Resolution for analog cameras is typically measured in Television Lines or TVL where resolution in digital cameras is typically measured in pixels and communicated by either the number of pixels both horizontally and vertical (such as 640 x 480) or as a total number of pixels in the image (such as 1.4 megapixels).

In a camera system, resolution is typically the balancing factor. Depending on the purpose of your system, you may need a large resolution in order to recognize faces or licenses plates. Under other circumstances, you don’t need a high resolution at all because your field of view is so large you only want a general idea of what is happening. Typically adjustments to a camera system are made to get the most resolution with the lowest storage and bandwidth requirements.

Self-installed Systems

Many DVR home and small business surveillance systems require an experienced professional to install. This can end up being very expensive. For those who want to buy a surveillance system on a budget, a self- installed system can be a good option. These systems are designed to be simple to install with minimal knowledge required. These products tend to come with step-by-step installation instructions.

Preferred Specification Minimums:

CCTV Digital/Analog Systems:
Camera Resolution and IR : Minimum of 600 tvl. The higher resolution the clearer. With IR minimum of 35 feet. Weatherproof if installing outside. DVR: Recording capacity of at least 20 days. Online calculator below. http://www.zmodo.com/tools/dvr_storage_calculator/dvr-storage-calculator.htm H.264 video compression is preferred compression

If you want to be able to view system remotely, make sure it has mobile phone viewing Apps for your type of phone. IE… Android, Windows or iphone.

Choosing CCTV Cameras

cctv1Setting up a CCTV camera system is not something to be taken lightly. It is a significant expenditure and should be thought through before a single pound is spent. The most important part of any CCTV system is the camera as it provides the eyes of the operation, so to speak. The key to buying the right CCTV camera is not simply in going out and buying the biggest or most expensive model on the market.

The key is to start by identifying the needs a camera has to meet. Once those needs are known, it becomes easier to find the right camera, as opposed to spending a large amount of time trying to select a camera without really knowing how or why it will be used. Knowing what matters to a given purchaser not only speeds the decision process, but also helps to ensure they make the right CCTV camera purchase decision. Therefore, the key is knowledge, knowing what to look for in order to meet the user’s needs.

How a CCTV Camera Works

Most CCTV, or closed-circuit TV cameras used in home security work, are solid-state electronic devices that are connected to a central recorder rather than broadcasted over the air. It is, therefore, a closed circuit, broadcasting to a specific location, rather than to anyone in range. The camera itself is usually made up of the following main components: lens, sensor, and digital signal processor, or DSP. In simplest terms, the lens focuses the light that is to be imaged onto the sensor, which then passes it to the DSP which converts it into a TV signal. This signal is then transmitted to a central location either by wire or wirelessly for storage and viewing.

Factors to Consider When Purchasing a CCTV Camera

There are a number of important factors to consider when purchasing a new CCTV camera, most of which map to one or more of the basic hardware components, so understanding the components and how they affect the CCTV camera’s performance is an important part of knowing what to look for.

Choosing the Right Lens

The lens is what gathers the light for the sensor. Everything the viewer sees, or that gets recorded on the DVR comes through the lens. It determines the distance at which a car’s number plate can be read, and a face can be recognised because the lens controls focus. In many cases, a better lens is more helpful than a higher output resolution, as the output is always limited by the input, and the lens determines the input.

Buyers should also look for a zoom lens. Some CCTV cameras come with digital zoom, where others have optical zoom, handled by the lens. Whenever possible, buyers should opt for optical over digital zoom. The problem with digital zoom is that it provides no more information than was in the original image. Optical zoom can actually add new information as it changes which light reaches the sensor.

Choosing the Right Sensor

Not all digital sensors are created equal. There are two main things to look for when studying the sensor specifications of a given CCTV camera: the first is the sensor type, the second is the sensor size. Most CCTV sensors are either CMOS or CCD. CMOS is less expensive and uses less power than CCD, but it is less sensitive and does not produce as clear an image, which can be particularly problematic when using the camera for identification purposes. One result of this is that CMOS-based sensors require more signal processing to produce a clear image.

The other important factor is the sensor size. The larger the sensor, the more light it can process, and the higher quality image it can produce. Most CCTV camera sensors come in one of two sizes: 1/4 inch, which measures 3.2 mm by 2.4 mm, and 1/3 inch, which measures 4.8 mm by 3.6 mm; giving it over twice the surface area of the smaller sensor. A larger sensor not only gathers more light, but in doing so gives the DSP more data to work with, which is especially helpful with the less capable processors used in budget cameras.

Choosing the Right Output Resolution

One very common specification for CCTV cameras is the number of horizontal lines of TV resolution it can output, or its TVL. This can range anywhere up to 700TVL, with many cameras coming in between 380TVL and 540TVL. Some experts recommend 420TVL as a minimum, but this is not always the case. While a high resolution is nice to have, the output depends on the input, so if the lens and sensor cannot match the output resolution, which is determined by the DSP, then the extra resolution is wasted. What matters most is having enough resolution to clearly display any image the camera can produce. Anything beyond that is unnecessary.

CCTV Camera Types

Not all CCTV cameras are the same size and shape. Different uses require different capabilities, and so there are different kinds of cameras to meet those needs. The following table shows the three basic types of cameras and some of their common uses.

 

CCTV Camera Type

Use

Bullet Camera These small cylindrical CCTV cameras are often used in environments where discretion is important, but there is no need to permanently install the camera in a protective dome. They work well in shops and service areas when there is a need to monitor the staff
Dome Camera A CCTV dome camera is an excellent choice for surveillance as it not only protects the camera from casual vandalism, but also provides a degree of security as it is often impossible to tell where the camera is pointed
IR Day/Night Camera While obvious in appearance, these cameras have the advantage of providing 24-hour outdoor coverage regardless of lighting conditions. They provide a colour image in the daytime, shifting to black and white for infrared viewing at night

Which camera a given buyer wants to use depends on their goals and needs. Understanding those needs make choosing the right CCTV camera that much easier.

Choosing the Right CCTV Camera

When choosing the right camera for a given purchaser’s needs, there are several things the buyer should look for. The first is a lens that gives the user a clear image of the area covered by the camera from its mounting point. If the area under surveillance is not in focus, then there is no real point to monitoring it. The next feature is the sensor, whenever possible buyers should go for the 1/3 inch CCD sensor as this provides the most information for the DSP to process. The final feature of the camera itself is the output resolution. While many companies may put this feature first, its usefulness is limited by the components in front of it.

Once the hardware capabilities have been determined, the next step is to decide which type of camera best fits the user’s needs. Those covering large outdoor areas, such as homeowners wanting to cover their property, may want to consider a day/night camera. Bullet cameras work well for monitoring staff, while ceiling-mounted dome cameras are good for covering the entire premises of a shop or business.

Conclusion

There are a number of things to look for when buying CCTV cameras. Some are technical factors which apply to every situation regardless of the intended use: every camera can benefit from a better lens and high quality sensor. Other factors are more dependent on the intended use of the CCTV camera, as some types are more useful in some situations than others. A day/night camera is great for keeping an eye on visitors coming up the drive, but it may not be the best choice for monitoring staff or business premises.

Many businesses may be better served with either dome cameras covering the entire floor or small bullet cameras to monitor the staff. Regardless of the buyer’s needs, it pays to look for quality. Therefore, understand how CCTV cameras work and the importance of optical zoom as opposed to digital zoom makes it easier to recognise said quality. The most successful purchases are informed purchases, and knowing what to look for makes buying a CCTV camera much easier.

The Importance of CCTV Security Systems in Business.

cctv1Security is fundamentally important across all walks of life to ensure the overall safety and possessions of all individuals are comprehensively protected. Commercial and residential properties are constructed to provide homeowners and companies with adequate protection against adverse weather conditions. Both buildings are also fit for purpose and provide the flexibility in which to create a stately household and professional business environment. This can be achieved via the integration of interior design features such as furniture and décor, in addition to any portable appliances and machinery to carry out daily tasks.

Throughout commercial properties such as office buildings and retail outlets, all companies require careful consideration of integrated security solutions. Although security guards provide an element of protection on the ground floor, their eyes are ears are not extensive enough to provide an over watch of the entire premises. This is where cameras within CCTV security systems play a crucial role within the daily running of a business.

Establishing an overview via placements of cameras within key areas within an office environment or retail store is an integral part of CCTV security systems. Although such systems are installed to protect against potential theft or criminal activity, they can play an important role within the productivity levels of employees. While certain individuals may feel their statutory rights are being undermined within a ‘Big Brother’ environment, it is done so to ensure the activities and conduct of all employees is maintained on a daily basis.

Cameras can be either situated within the middle of a room or in the corners. Although their placements affects the images and security angle each camera can pick up, the sheer presence of cameras can act as a deterrent to any criminal. Knowing their actions is likely to be detected by one from a multitude of cameras which can clearly depict their face and appearance can decrease the rate of theft and crime.

The presence of CCTV as integrated security solutions can also be important for the work ethic and efficiency of employees. As their safety and wellbeing can be placed under threat by an individual who carries out violence or a criminal act, it is vital to integrate adequate protection. In doing so, it can play a fundamental role in catching any perpetrators who steal or damage valuable products or machinery, and put employees at risk.

It is crucial to take security seriously in this day and age. It is not just businesses and commercial properties that need good security but it is our homes too. With crime increasing and burglaries very common place, it is very important to consider the available security options and choose one that is the best fit for you.

One of the most popular and cost effective ways of providing security in the home and place of work is with cctv cameras and equipment. CCTV cameras can act as a very successful deterrent to thieves and burglars, certainly making them think twice at the very least. The technology behind security equipment these days is incredibly advanced, and it is even possible to hook the cameras up to an ordinary television or computer to watch the footage.

The following are some of the concerns both home and business have and Top 10 Reasons of Why Install CCTV.

  1. Prevent CrimeIf you’re worried about crime, cameras can not only catch criminals in the act, but the very presence of CCTV systems can make a would-be criminal think twice about any wrong-doing. Think about it, if you planned rob or vandalize a store or office, would you want to do it if you knew you were being recorded?
  2. Prevent Employee TheftIf you suspects one of your employees of wrong-doing but don’t know where to begin to try to get to the bottom of things, a camera can be a very helpful tool. This is especially true if you own an establishment where cash is exchanged. Cameras posted near cash registers or other places where employees are often stationed, not only can show you if an employee is stealing, but may even deter an employee from committing a crime if they know you’re watching.
  3. Be a useful piece of evidenceIf a crime is committed in or around your business and the person accused of committing the crime was caught on camera, you’ve got an extra piece of evidence for a court case. Jurors and judges can watch footage or view photos from your security cameras and establish that the person on trial did indeed commit the crime. Not only will you be preventing the same person from causing you more trouble in the future, you’ll be helping out your entire community.
  4. Help law enforcement solve crimeWhen someone commits a crime and is caught on camera, police and other law enforcement officials can use the footage to release video or photos to the public via various media outlets. Having a picture of the suspect can make a world of difference when it comes to making an arrest and getting dangerous criminal off the street.
  5. Keep an eye on children and elderly folksWith a CCTV system at home, you can monitor the safety of your children and elderly folks while you are away. Besides, you can keep an eye on your maid and make sure nothing out of the ordinary is going on.
  6. Keep an eye on thingsIf you can’t be at the office all the time but like to know what’s going on, a security camera can help do just that. You can keep an eye on things from your home computer with a few quick clicks of your mouse and make sure your business is running smoothly and nothing out of the ordinary is going on.
  7. Protecting your staffCCTV can protect your staff physically against violence from customers. At the same time, it can also protect them against false accusations – perhaps coming from colleagues or even from client and customers.
  8. Encourage good behaviourHaving a CCTV camera inside offices may help in creating discipline among the employees. For bosses, who want their presence felt so that efficiency at work is optimized, a camera hovering the employees will give the same effect.
  9. Monitoring high-risk areaCameras may be placed in high-risk areas inside a factory. Such areas may include those in which fires can possibly break out. A camera in place there will lessen potential damages because emergency measures can be made immediately. Cameras may also be placed in areas where accidents can happen. This is important so that life-saving measures can be employed promptly.
  10. Increase customer’s confidenceBanks and shops equipped with CCTV cameras give the customers a sense of security and safety. The customers feel secure and this enhances the customers’ confidence.